True Version of the Philippine Revolution
By Don Emilio Aguinaldo y Famy

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Public Domain Books

Chapter VII. The Philippine Flag

In conformity with my orders issued on the 1st of September, all Philippine vessels hoisted the national flag, the Marines of the Filipino flotilla being the first to execute that order. Our little flotilla consisted of some eight Spanish steam launches (which had been captured) and five vessels of greater dimensions, namely, the Taaleño, Baldyan, Taal, Bulucan, and Purisima Concepcion. These vessels were presented to the Philippine Government by their native owners and were converted by us, at our Arsenal, into gunboats, 8 and 9 centimetre guns, taken from the sunken Spanish warships, being mounted on board.

Ah! what a beautiful, inspiring joyous sight that flag was fluttering in the breeze from the topmasts of our vessels, side by side, as it were, with the ensigns of other and greater nations, among whose mighty warships our little cruisers passed to and fro dipping their colours, the ensign of Liberty and Independence! With what reverence and adoration it was viewed as it suddenly rose in its stately loneliness crowning our victories, and, as it were, smiling approvingly upon the undisciplined Philippine Army in the moment of its triumphs over the regular forces of the Spanish Government! One’s heart swells and throbs again with the emotions of extreme delight; the soul is filled with pride, and the goal of patriotism seems well-nigh reached in the midst of such a magnificent spectacle!

At the end of June I called on Admiral Dewey, who, after complimenting me on the rapid triumphs of the Philippine Revolution, told me he had been asked by the German and French Admirals why he allowed the Filipinos to display on their vessels a flag that was not recognized. Admiral Dewey said his reply to the French and German Admirals was–with his knowledge and consent the Filipinos used that flag, and, apart from this, he was of opinion that in view of the courage and steadfastness of purpose displayed in the war against the Spaniards the Filipinos deserved the right to use their flag.

I thereupon expressed to the Admiral my unbounded gratitude for such unequivocal protection, and on returning to the shore immediately ordered the Philippine flotilla to convey troops to the other provinces of Luzon and to the Southern islands, to wage war against the Spaniards who garrisoned them.


Introduction  •  Chapter I. The Revolution of 1896  •  Chapter II. The Treaty of Biak-na-bató  •  Chapter III. Negotiations  •  Chapter IV. The Revolution of 1898  •  Chapter V. The Dictatorial Government  •  Chapter VI. The First Triumphs  •  Chapter VII. The Philippine Flag  •  Chapter VIII. Expedition to Bisayas  •  Chapter IX. The Steamer “Compania de Filipinas”  •  Chapter X. The Proclamation of Independence  •  Chapter XI. The Spanish Commission  •  Chapter XII. More American Troops  •  Chapter XIII. The Thirteenth of August  •  Chapter XIV. First Clouds  •  Chapter XV. Vain Hopes  •  Chapter XVI. The American Commission  •  Chapter XVII. Impolitic Acts  •  Chapter XVIII. The Mixed Commission  •  Chapter XIX. Outbreak of Hostilities  •  Notes